Broadoak Primary School

History

 

“We are not makers of history. We are made by history.”   (Martin Luther King Jnr.)

 

Vision Statement

In our History curriculum at Broadoak, our main aim is to encourage curiosity in our children and develop a love for history, inspiring them to want to learn more about the past. We believe that a high quality History education will create opportunities for pupils to gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. Through our teaching of exciting historical topics, we equip our pupils to ask perceptive questions, challenge them to think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments and develop perspective and judgment. History helps pupils to understand the process of change, the complexity of people’s lives and the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well their own identity and cultural capital, including the challenges of their time.

Aims and Objectives

At all key stages History teaching aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day.
  • Know how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world.
  • Know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world including ancient civilisations and characteristic features of non-European societies.
  • Gain and use a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’.
  • Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance.
  • Use their knowledge of historical concepts to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends and frame historically valid questions.
  • Show their understanding through the creation of their own structured accounts, including performances and written narratives and analyses.
  • Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used to make historical claims and create contrasting arguments.
  • To communicate ideas, interpret different aspects of history, understanding of continuity and change – in and between periods.
  • Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts including geographical, cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social aspects.
  • Can use their understanding to place history into different timescales.

In order to achieve our aims, we provide:

 

  • High quality teaching and learning which enables all children to succeed and achieve
  • An interesting learning environment in which children feel safe and secure
  • Opportunities for children to be actively involved and engaged in their own learning, through creative approaches to learning with strong curriculum links to other subjects when appropriate
  • Opportunities to promote independence
  • Evaluations of children’s progress towards the Early Learning Goals and National Curriculum guidelines which inform planning at all stages
  • Effective monitoring of teaching and learning.

Broadoak Primary School

History

Intent Implementation Impact
What will take place before teaching in the classroom? What will this look like in the classroom? How will this be measured
The school’s senior leadership team will: Our teaching sequence will be: Pupil Voice will show:

==

  • Lead the school staff to develop a clear overarching curriculum intent which drives the ongoing development and improvement of all curriculum subjects.
  • Ensure that the curriculum leaders have appropriate time to develop their specific curriculum intent through careful research and development.
  • Provide sufficient funding to ensure that implementation is high quality.

 

  • Big picture: Placing of the History being studied in the chronological context of previous learning, using the class timeline.
  • Retrieval/ overlearning of key elements of historical periods through quizzes/ ‘Blast from the Past’.
  • Learning review: Brief review of learning covered in previous lesson/s.
  • Specify key vocabulary to be used and its meaning.
  • Conduct Historical enquiry using a variety of sources and / or artefacts
  • Interpret their findings.
  • Modelling where appropriate.
  • Communicate their historical knowledge and understanding appropriately.
  • Evaluate their learning and compare with other historical periods studied as appropriate.
  • Learning in class will be supported and extended by the inclusion of educational visits and visitors. ==

 

  • A developed understanding of the knowledge and skills of historians at an age-appropriate level.
  • A progression of understanding, with appropriate vocabulary which supports and extends understanding.
  • Confidence in discussing history, their own work and identifying their own strengths and areas for development.
  • To be able to recall key aspects of their prior learning
  • To articulate with confidence their current learning and understanding
  • To know what an accomplished Broadoak Historian is.
The Curriculum Leader will: Our classrooms will: Displays around school / books will show:

 

  • Understand and articulate the expectations of the curriculum to support teaching and support staff in the delivery.
  • Create a curriculum map which ensures appropriate coverage of knowledge, skills and vocabulary.
  • Ensure an appropriate progression of knowledge is in place which supports pupils in knowing more and remembering more as historians.
  • Ensure an appropriate progression of history skills and knowledge is in place over time so that pupils are supported to be the best historians they can be, and challenge teachers to support struggling historians and extend more competent ones.
  • Ensure an appropriate progression for vocabulary is in place for each phase of learning, which builds on prior learning.
  • Identify historians who underpin specific areas of the curriculum and raise aspirations for pupils.
  • Keep up to date with current history research and subject development through an appropriate subject body or professional group.--==

 

 

  • Provide appropriate quality equipment for each area of the curriculum. books, sources, artefacts.
  • Have developed learning walls which include carefully chosen vocabulary and visual aids which children can constantly refer back to in order to support their learning.
  • Learning walls will capture evidence over time for identified children.
  • Have access to knowledge organisers which children can refer to during lessons.  These are used to prompt upcoming learning and for review.
  • Be organised so that pupils can work in small groups or whole class as appropriate to support pupils in their development of their skills.
  • Have access in reading corners to historical texts which are relevant to the current topic in order to extend and further engage children in their learning.
  • Key texts within English which are connected to history, and are used to broaden children’s understanding of historical periods, experiences and vocabulary.

 

  • Pupils have had opportunities for practice and refinement of skills.
  • Children have had opportunities to revisit prior learning.
  • An understanding of chronology.
  • A varied and engaging curriculum which develops a range of historical skills.
  • Developed and creative final pieces of work which showcase the knowledge and skills learned.
  • Clear progression of skills in line with expectations set out in the progression grids.
  • Reflections of their learning to demonstrate understanding.
  • That pupils, over time, develop a range of skills and techniques across all of the areas of the historical curriculum.
The class teacher will, with support from the curriculum leader: Our children will / will be: The curriculum leader will:

 

  • Follow the curriculum map and know where the History units fits into the whole curriculum.
  • Deliver learning from the leaning journeys which have been sequenced to develop knowledge, skills and understanding.
  • Teach vocabulary which is essential to support children’s knowledge.
  • Personally pursue support for this subject if needed by drawing upon the expertise of the subject leader to develop their subject knowledge and skills gaps prior to teaching.
  • Ensure that resources are appropriate, of high quality and are plentiful so that all pupils have the correct tools and materials.

 

  • Motivated because they are challenged by the curriculum which they are provided with.
  • Engaged in the learning as the curriculum is delivered in a variety of ways including drama, discussion and use of technology.
  • Resilient learners who overcome barriers and understand their own strengths and areas for development.
  • Able to critique their own work as a historian because they know how to be successful.
  • Safe and happy in history lessons which give them opportunities to explore their own creative development.
  • Encouraged and nurtured to overcome any barriers to their learning or self-confidence because feedback is positive and focuses historical skills and knowledge.
  • Develop historical skills and confidence over time because of careful planning, focused delivery and time to practice and hone skills.
  • Develop empathy and understanding of social history 

 

  • Celebrate the successes of pupils through planned displays and achievement assemblies.
  • Collate appropriate evidence over time which evidences that pupils know more and remember more.
  • Monitor the standards in the History to ensure the outcomes are at least expected levels by talking to children, looking at their books, and completing learning walks/drop-ins to assess the extent to which children know more and remember more.
  • Provide ongoing CPD support based on the outcomes of subject monitoring to ensure that the impact of the curriculum is wide reaching and positive.
  • Keep samples of children’s work in a portfolio which shows the expected level of achievement in each year of the school.

xx

Children will leave us with a Backpack of knowledge, skills and understanding as detailed below:

xx

In their Broadoak Backpack for Life,

an accomplished Historian will…x

 

  • Be able to think critically and challenge ideas to make their own reasoned judgements
  • Be curious and passionate about people and times from the past and how they impact the present
  • Consider the perspectives of others and formulate their own
  • Be empathetic towards others and their diverse experiences in history
  • Have an in-depth understanding and knowledge of key historical periods
  • Be inspired to learn more about history in their future education
  • Have a good understanding of chronology
  • Use, evaluate and interpret evidence

History in Early Years

History is woven throughout the Foundation Stage curriculum and concentrates on developing children’s appreciation of time and past events.  We use stories, role play and themes based on first hand experiences to begin to introduce some of the language and skills of history.   History often plays a large part in the topic work covered during the year, relating to the relevant objectives set out in the Early Learning Goals through ‘Understanding the World’.

History in Key Stage One

In KS1, these cross curricular links are maintained as the children continue to make connections between their own lives and the lives of people from the past.  They develop an awareness of the past by investigating topics further from their own experiences and begin to know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework.  The children identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods and learn some everyday historical terms.  They begin to ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events.  They begin to understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.  

History in Key Stage Two

In KS2 we continue to develop and arouse children’s interest in the past and its influence on life today as we learn about people and events from British, local and world history.  Through the topics covered, the children develop their chronological knowledge and understanding and we encourage them to ask and answer their own historical questions and use historical vocabulary and terms.  The children build on their prior learning and make meaningful connections across time and place. They begin to be aware of connections, contrasts and trends over time and consider aspects of change, cause, similarity, difference and significance.  We encourage the children to think about how and why people interpret the past in different ways and understand that our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Whole School History Curriculum Overview

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Whole School

History

Curriculum Overview

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Autumn

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Spring Summer
Nursery
Reception
Subject Focus

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How have toys changed since

my grandparents were young?

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What does it take to be an

excellent explorer?

**

What was it like when the

Queen came to the throne in 1953?

 Year 1 

 

**

The children will begin to understand that some objects belong in the past and others in the present.  They will identify old and new toys and explain what toys from the past might have been used for.

**

The children will recognise different explorers and understand how they were all successful. They will be able to describe the achievements of each explorer and make comparisons between one explorer to another and the contributions the have made. 

**

**

The children will learn about Queen Elizabeth II and identify changes in Britain during her reign.  They will also explore the various members of the Royal Family and about succession to the throne.

National Curriculum Objective:

Changes within living memory, including a focus on significant people within their own locality.

**

National Curriculum Objective

The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements

National Curriculum Objective

The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.

Subject Focus

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Why did the Great Fire of

London start?

**

Who helped flight

take off?

**

Why are Mae C.Jemison and

Neil Armstrong brave people?

Year 2

 

The children will explore how buildings were different in the past and present.  They will become familiar with the sequence of events of the Great Fire and identify why the fire started and how it spread so quickly.

The children will identify and describe the lives and events of key individuals who contributed to the history of flight.  They will recognise the differences between the first aeroplanes and modern aircrafts and will be able to sequence the events of the History of Flight.

**

The children will identify and describe the lives and events of key individuals who contributed to the history of space travel.  They will be able to explain what the Space Race was, sequence the events of the History of Space Travel and make comparisons between Neil Armstrong and Mae C. Jemison.

**

National Curriculum Objective:

Events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally.

National Curriculum Objective

The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements

National Curriculum Objective:  

Events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally/The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.

 Subject Focus

**

Is the ‘Croods’ animation

based on fact?

**

What was life like in the

Bronze and Iron Ages?

**

Were the Mayans a

magnificent civilisation?

Year 3

 

The children will learn who the first people of Britain were during the Stone Age.  They will know that the Stone Age happened as part of prehistory/prehistoric and will begin to understand what life was like for the first people of Britain.

**

The children will understand the differences and advancements from the Bronze Age to Iron Age.  They will know how lifestyles, weapons, tools and buildings changed due to the introduction of new materials.  In addition, they will learn that that life was relatively peaceful in the Bronze Age but more violent in the Iron Age. They will learn that the Iron Age people of Britain were known as the Celts and be able to compare and contrast the key changes between the buildings, lifestyles (communities, power, wealth and coinage, farming) and materials used.

**

The children will learn what Mayan life was like – culture, religion, environment, jobs, clothing etc.  They will be able to describe some of the main events, people and aspects of their lives from the period of the Mayan people and how this compares to the Stone Age - Iron Age.  Within their learning, the children will be able to use their acquired knowledge and understanding to decide if the Mayans were a magnificent civilisation.

National Curriculum Objective:

Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age. 

National Curriculum Objective: 

Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age. 

National Curriculum Objective:

A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history.

 Subject Focus

**

Would you rather be a child

now or in Ancient Egypt?

**

What have the Greeks

done for us? 

**

Why were the Romans

so powerful?

Year 4

**

 The children will explore what an ‘ancient civilization’ is and will compare and contrast the Ancient Egyptian period to aspects of British history at the same time (Stone Age – Iron Age).  They will use sources to understand some of the main events, people and lifestyles of the wealthy and the poor and sequence these chronologically and become able to make a judgment about if life was better as a child in Ancient Egypt or the present day. 

The children will be able to explain, summarise and demonstrate an understanding of what the Ancient Greeks did to influence our modern society. (Including a focus on art, theatre, poetry, democracy, Olympics...)  They will be able to use sources to understand some of the main events, people and lifestyles of the wealthy and the poor and sequence these chronologically.

**

The children will understand why the Romans were so powerful based on their military tactics and will identify how the Roman Empire grew due to invading different countries and continents.  They will learn why the Roman Army was so powerful and how it was put together and explain the resistance faced by the Romans in Britain.  The children will compare and contrast the Roman period to aspects of British history (Stone Age – Iron Age)

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National Curriculum Objective:

The achievements of the earliest civilizations.

National Curriculum Objective:

The Ancient Greek period.

National Curriculum Objective:

The Roman Empire and its influence on Britain.

Subject Focus

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What was life like in

Anglo Saxon Britain?

**

Were the Vikings really

vicious intruders?

**

Was the Tudor reign a

time of great change?

Year 5

The children will understand the Anglo-Saxon invasion, including their settlements and division of kingdoms.  They will use sources and artefacts to understand some of the main events, lifestyles, culture and religion of the Anglo-Saxons.  They will compare and contrast the Anglo-Saxon period to aspects of British history (Stone Age – Iron Age) and be able to examine an artefact and explain what it shows us about the people of the time and can use this evidence to support my point of view.

**

The children will understand the Viking invasion, including the perception of them as savage heathens.  They will use sources and artefacts to understand some of the main events, lifestyles, culture and religion of the Anglo-Saxons and Vikings, understanding how some accounts could be bias or empathise with one group of people.  The children will create historically valid questions and will test out a hypothesis in order to answer questions and reach an informed conclusion (eg the Vikings were vicious raiders).  They will compare and contrast the Viking period to aspects of British history (Stone Age – Iron Age)

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The children will learn that the Battle of Bosworth was the initial change to a Tudor monarch.  They will be able to identify significant changes through the Tudor period, with a specific focus on the English Reformation.  They will also learn about Henry VIII and that he was a key individual in instigating significant changes.

National Curriculum Objective:

Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots.

National Curriculum Objective:

The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor.

National Curriculum Objective:

A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

Subject Focus

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Why was the battle of Britain so successful?

**

What was the impact of

WW II on Manchester?

(NB Delivered in Autumn 2 Term)

**

What slums, squalor and salvation occurred in Victorian times?

Year 6

The children will learn why WWII started and who was involved.  They will reach informed conclusions by identifying some cause and impact of events in WWII on Britain and wider world.  The children will also make reasoned judgements about why the Battle of Britain was successful and contributed to the British victory/German defeat.  They will give and explain reasons why people in the past may have acted in the way they did and how their lives have impacted on this nation and am able to empathise with them.

The children will reach informed conclusions by identifying some cause and impact of events in WWII on Britain and wider world.  They will learn about the impact that WWII had on Manchester and compare it to the effect on other countries across the world.  They will give and explain reasons why people in the past may have acted in the way they did and how their lives have impacted on this nation and am able to empathise with them.

**

The children learn how the impact of the Industrial Revolution resulted in Angel Meadow developing into a slum.  They will learn what the Industrial Revolution and cotton industry was like in Manchester and how this links to the worker bee.  The children will be able to identify the contrasts between life as a poor person living in poverty in the slums and squalor compared to the life of the rich (particularly factory owners.)  They will be able to compare and contrast the Victorian period to aspects of British history (Stone Age – Iron Age),  They will know what salvation was brought to the poor mostly by Queen Victoria, such as educational advances, workers’ welfare and treatment of the people.

**

National Curriculum Objective:

A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

National Curriculum Objective:

A local history study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

National Curriculum Objective:

A local history study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.